THAI PEANUT QUINOA SALAD

thai-peanut-quinoa-salad_654

Ingredients

Dressing

1/4 cup  soy sauce
1/4 cup  peanut butter
1/8 cup vinegar
1/8 cup fresh lime juice (about 3 limes)
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tbsp hot sauce (or to taste)
1 tsp ground ginger

Salad

1 cup dry quinoa
2 cups cole slaw or broccoli slaw mix
1 cup bean sprouts
1 cucumber,diced
2 green onions chopped
1/2 cup dry roasted peanuts, chopped (unsalted or lightly salted)Optional add-ins: cooked chicken, pork, shrimp or tofu

Directions

Combine all dressing ingredients in a small microwavable mixing bowl with lid.  Cover and cook on high 1 minute.  Stir or whisk until well blended.  Microwave another 30 -60 seconds if needed to blend well. Set aside.Prepare quinoa according to directions listed on package. To assemble salad layer cooked quinoa, cabbage,  bean sprouts, cucumber, green onions and peanuts. Garnish with fresh cilantro or parsley if desired. Drizzle with dressing to taste and serve.

Recipe Source: Cooking Classy

I ADJUSTED THIS RECIPE TAKING OUT A FEW INGREDIENTS I JUST WOULD NEVER HAVE IN THE CUPBOARD!

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MEDITERRANIAN STUFFED PEPPERS

I MADE THESE STUFFED PEPPERS GLUTEN FREE BY SUBSTITUTING QUINOA FOR ORZO!

 

MEDITERRANIAN STUFFED PEPPERS -1

4 large red peppers, halved lengthwise, seeded and cored
1 ½ cups quinoa
28 oz can diced tomatoes
1 cup pitted black olives, halved
8 oz feta cheese block, crumbled
1 ½ lbs chicken breasts, grilled and cut into bite-sized pieces
½ cup Kraft Greek Dressing with Feta and Oregano

Coat 13” X 9” baking dish with non-stick spray. Place pepper halves in bottom. Cook quinoa according to directions. In large bowl, combine quinoa and next three ingredients. Meanwhile, grill chicken, cut up and add to quinoa mixture. Drizzle Greek dressing over top and mix well. Stuff peppers. Bake 350 degrees F 40-50 minutes.
*Feta crumbles are likely fine but some sources say they may have wheat starch added to prevent clumping. Kraft uses potato starch in their shredded blends.

 

 

GREEK CHICKEN SOUVLAKI

chicken_souvlaki_salad

GREEK CHICKEN SOUVLAKI SALAD

4 grilled chicken breasts, cubed
4 c chopped romaine lettuce
1 green pepper, diced
1/2 red onion, diced
2 tomatoes, diced
4 oz crumbled feta cheese
4 whole wheat pitas, cut in half
8 oz Kraft Greek Dressing with feta and oregano

I marinate the chicken breasts in Greek Dressing for several hours and then grill and cube.  Chop all the vegetables and arrange on a serving platter with the chicken and crumbled feta.  Arrange the pitas on another plate.  Let people serve themselves – either closed or open souvlaki – and add Greek Dressing to taste.

 

 

 

 

SALAD SUNDAE

Salad Sundae

I CALL THIS SALAD SUNDAE BECAUSE IT IS MORE LIKE A DESERT THAN A SALAD!
10 oz Baby Spinach
1 Qt Strawberries, sliced ( add a touch of sugar)
4 oz crumbled blue cheese
1/3 c pine nuts
8 oz Kraft Signature Collection Creamy Poppy Seed Dressing

SERVE WITH GRILLED FISH, CHICKEN, PORK OR STEAK!

SPICED CHICKEN AND BEAN SALAD

SPICED CHICKEN AND BEAN SALAD

2 Tbsp oil
1 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 # chicken breasts/tenders
1 c frozen green beans
1 c frozen wax beans (if you can find them – what happened to these?)
1 c frozen lima beans
1 avocado, halved, seeded, peeled, sliced
3 oz crumbled blue cheese
Ranch dressing

Combine oil and spices. Coat Chicken and grill 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile, combine beans in microwave dish. Microwave until heated through. Prepare avocado. Cut up chicken and serve over salad with ranch dressing.

I ADDED BLACK BEANS TO THE SALAD AND GRILLED SOME HOMEMADE SWEET POTATO FRIES (USED THE SAME OIL AND SPICES) WITH THE CHICKEN! JUST DELICIOUS!

QUICK AND EASY FOR A WINTER COOK OUT! LOTS OF COLORS MEANS LOTS OF ANTIOXIDANTS AND CANCER FIGHTING.  YOU CAN USE A LOW FAT RANCH DRESSING BUT I PREFER TO USE LESS OF THE REAL STUFF!

YOUR GRAIN GLOSSARY

GRAINS ARE VERY VERSATILE:

  • USED AS BREAKFAST CEREAL, TO MAKE PANCAKES OR A DISH WITH YOGURT AND FRUIT
  • ADDED TO STIR FRIES OR COLD SALADS FOR NUTTY TASTE
  • TOASTED AND USED AS A BREADING ON FISH AND MEATS
  • ADDED TO CHILI AND SOUPS
  • USED TO EXTEND GROUND BEEF IN BURGERS, MEATLOAF AND MEATBALLS

CHANGE UP YOUR GRAINS AND TRY SOME NEW ONES USING THE COOKING IDEAS BELOW!

Grain

Description

Taste

Cooking Details

Nutritional Facts

Amaranth

Tiny kernels, usually pale yellow. Porridge-like when simmered, making it useful as a food thickener. Can bake or steam, as well. Available as cereal and flour. Earthy and sweet. Compared to beets. Many people add a strongly flavored liquid to this grain when cooking it—broth and tomato juice are good choices. Good when mixed with other grains and mixed with vegetables as a stir-fry. Can toast similar to popcorn and use as a breading. ½ cup (C) amaranth flakes:
67 calories
3 grams (g) protein
1 g fat
14 g carbohydrate
2 g fiber
3 milligrams (mg) calcium
0 mg iron

Barley

Most of the barley in the US is used in beer production. Barley is chewier than rice. Barley flakes are served as a hot cereal. Grits are toasted and broken into small pieces. Earthy flavor. Generally simmered or used as an ingredient in casseroles or soups. Cooking time varies from a negligible amount of time for the preparation of grits to about 1¾ hours for hulled barley. Barley and fruit make a pleasing breakfast dish. Substitute barley for rice or pasta in almost any dish. ½ C cooked barley:
99 calories
2 g protein
0 g fat
23 g carbohydrate
3 g fiber
9 mg calcium
1 mg iron

Buckwheat

Kasha consists of buckwheat kernels that are roasted and hulled, and then cracked into granules. Buckwheat grits are finely ground groats.  Buckwheat flour is available in most markets. Strong, nutty flavor. Pairs well with beef, root vegetables, cabbage, winter squash, and eggplant. Buckwheat flour is commonly used in pancake preparation. Buckwheat is used as an alternative to rice as a side dish or ingredient. Buckwheat grits are served as a hot cereal. Kasha is good as a filling for meat, poultry, or vegetables.  Kasha is also excellent for cold salads. Simmer or bake kasha, whole buckwheat, and buckwheat grits. Cooking buckwheat kernels with a beaten egg prevents the kernels from sticking together. ½ C cooked buckwheat groats:
77 calories
3 g protein
1 g fat
17 g carbohydrate
2 g fiber
6 mg calcium
1 mg iron

Bulgur

Steamed, dried, and cracked-wheat berries. Earthy, nutty, and tender. Cooks like brown rice. Substitute for rice in all dishes. Use the finely ground variety to prepare a hot breakfast cereal. ½ C cooked bulgur:
56 calories
2 g protein
0 g fat
12 g carbohydrate
3 g fiber
7 mg calcium
1 mg iron

Millet

Extremely small, pale yellow or reddish-orange grain. Usually purchased in pearl form. Bland.  Absorbs the flavor of any food that it is cooked with it.  Some people say that millet tastes like corn. Simmer like rice. To achieve a creamy consistency, stir frequently, adding extra liquid during cooking. Steam cracked millet to make couscous. Cook as a hot cereal and add fruit, yogurt, and spices. Use in a casserole with strong-flavored vegetables. Add millet to stew, chili, and bean dishes. Add to any ground-beef mixtures without adding much flavor. Use millet in baked goods that would benefit from added texture. A good choice for grain when making flatbread. ½ C cooked millet:
101 calories
3 g protein
1 g fat
21 g carbohydrate
1 g fiber
3 mg calcium
1 mg iron

Oats

Oat bran is created from the outer layer of oat groats and is usually sold as a hot cereal. Oat groats are whole-oat kernels, which are cooked like rice. Rolled oats are heated and pressed flat. Steel-cut oats are groats that are vertically sliced and have a chewy texture when cooked. Oats are the main ingredient of granola and muesli. Mild flavored. Oat groats and steel-cut oats take a longer time than most grains to prepare. Old-fashioned oats take about 5 minutes to cook, while quick-cooking oats take only about 1 minute. All forms of oats are good eaten as breakfast cereal. Prepare groats into a pilaf and serve as a side dish. Add steel-cut oats to soups and stews. Use rolled oats as a filling for poultry and vegetables. Add toasted oats to salads, use as a breading for poultry, or add to baked goods. Use rolled oats in place of 20% of the wheat flour in yeast breads, and one part to every two parts of wheat flour in most other baked goods. ½ C cooked quick oats:
71 calories
2 g protein
1 g fat
13 g carbohydrate
2 g fiber
13 mg calcium
1 mg iron

Quinoa

Quinoa grains are flat, pointed ovals. Quinoa comes in a variety of colors (pale yellow, red, and black). When cooked, the external germ spirals out, creating a “tail.” Delicate and light flavor. Rinse prior to cooking. Brown in a skillet for 5 minutes prior to simmering or baking. Good when served as a pilaf, in a baked casserole, in vegetable soup, or as a cold salad. Especially good when combined with buckwheat. Add quinoa to puddings. ½ C cooked quinoa:
111 calories
4 g protein
2 g fat
20 g carbohydrate
5 g fiber
16 mg calcium
1 mg iron

Rye

A bluish-gray grain, similar in appearance to wheat, excerpt for the color. Rye flakes are similar to rolled oats. Whole rye berries, groats, and kernels resemble wheat berries. Cracked rye is the quickest-cooking variety. Robust flavor. Simmer rye berries with milder-tasting grains, such as brown rice or wheat berries. Combine cracked rye with cracked wheat. Combine rye flakes with oatmeal. Rye berries are good when cooked in broth with chopped nuts and raisins. Use cooked rye berries as an ingredient in poultry stuffing. Cracked rye is good when cooked in fruit juice with dried fruit. Add rye flakes to ground-beef mixtures. ½ C cooked cream of rye cereal:
54 calories
1 g protein
0 g fat
12 g carbohydrate
2 g fiber
6 mg calcium
0 mg iron

Spelt

A type of wheat. Mild flavored. Excellent for making risottos and pilafs. Easily added to hearty soups, stews, and chili. Best with tomato-based dishes. ½ C cooked spelt:
123 calories
6 g protein
2 g fat
25 g carbohydrate
4 g fiber
9 mg calcium
1 mg iron

Triticale

Crossbred from wheat and rye. Cracked triticale, triticale berries, and triticale flakes are comparable to their wheat or rye counterparts. Most often used as flour in breads. Rich, nutty, flavor. Brown with a little oil and then simmer. Substitute for either wheat berries or bulgur in any recipe. Use in cold salads, pilafs, stuffing, soups, or as a ground-beef stretcher. 1 ounce triticale:
94 calories
4 g protein
1 g fat
20 g carbohydrate
0 g fiber
5 mg calcium
0 mg iron

MEDITERRANEAN MARINATED VEGETABLE SALAD

Mediterranean Marinated Salad (2)

MEDITERRANEAN MARINATED VEGETABLE SALAD
List of Ingredients2 large Tomatoes, chopped
1 sweet green Pepper , chopped
1 large yellow pepper, chopped
1 large zucchini, sliced
1/4 cup Onion slices
2 Garlic cloves, minced
1/4 c Italian Dressing (lite if desired)
4 oz Three Cheese Crumbles

Instructions for Preparation

Toss together first five ingredients in large bowl. Combine garlic and dressing. Pour over veggies; toss to coat; add cheese; mix lightly. Refrigerate at least one hour and stir occasionally to marinate.

NutritionFacts
per serving
makes 8 servings
Amount per serving
Calories 45
Calories from fat 20
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 2.3g 4%
Saturated Fat 1.4g 7%
Cholesterol 8mg 3%
Sodium 66mg 3%
Total
Carbohydrate 2.4g
1%
Dietary Fiber 0.3g 1%
Protein 3.8g
Percent values are based on a 2,000 calorie per day diet. Your daily values may differ.
Additional Information
44.6% of calories from Fat
21.4% from Carbohydrates
33.9% from Protein

This was made using Recipe Calc Software©
Click Here to get your own FREE trial copy of Recipe Calc or visit my website below
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COOL SIDE DISH FOR SUMMER USING SEASONAL VEGGIES!

GREENS WITH GOAT CHEESE, ORANGES AND GRAPES

GREENS WITH GOAT CHEESE, ORANGES AND GRAPES

1 Bag (10 oz) Spring Mix Greens 2 cans (11oz) mandarin orange segments, drained 1/2 cup real bacon pieces 1 cup thinly sliced red onion 1/2 cup pecan halves 1/2 cup crumbled goat cheese A bunch of red grapes 1/3 … Continue reading