BEWARE OF PACKAGED GLUTEN FREE PRODUCTS!

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY http://inspectorgorgeous.com/2015/08/03/flat-bread-or-buns-why-not-both/

Not all gluten free breads are created equal.

Sure, they may taste amazing, but are they much “healthier” than buying whole grain breads?

Not if you have celiac disease…BUT if you are just gluten sensitive or attempting to lose weight by cutting the dough, you may be shocked to find what ingredients are lurking in your gluten free goodies.

1. TONS of fillers. Don’t get me wrong, I occasionally use a food grade additive in my baked goods to give them texture. The levels that they are added to *some* of these pre-packaged foods can sometimes be alarming.

2. Boatloads of Sugar. The only difference between homemade pancake batter and gluten free is the gluten. Oh, and did I mention the amounts of sugar, preservatives, and fast digesting rice starch? Because that’s in there, too.

3. Less fiber. Everybody poops, until you stop eating fiber and start living on rice starch and tapioca starch with a few veggies thrown in the mix.

TRY LIZ’S PROTEIN BREADS AS AN EASY ALTERNATIVE TO PREPACKAGED!

Parmesan Protein Buns

Make it a flat bread or a bun. Either choice is delightful.

5 Eggs, separated (we are using 1/4 cup of the yolks)

1/3 cup Unsweetened Protein Powder (There are several available at WalMart)

Add ins: 2 TBSP Shredded Parmesan OR 2 TBSP Garlic Hummus

1/4 tsp Xanthan Gum- OPTIONAL- this gives it more of a “bread like” consistency

1 Cookie sheet covered with foil and cooking spray

Preaheat oven to 350° and have the xanthan gum and protein powder ready and portioned out before beginning. Separate the egg whites from the egg yolks and reserve 1 /4 cup yolk (beaten) for later in the process. In a large bowl, beat the egg whites with a hand mixer, starting at a low speed and gradually increasing until foamy. Continue to beat until STIFF. Slowly fold in protein powder

Next, the egg yolks you reserved can now be mixed well and slowly added to the egg white foam. Fold in gently (not with your mixer) as to keep the foam intact. You can fold in any of your “add ins” too.

Scoop mixture onto cookie sheet in small mounds for buns. For flat bread, pour evenly onto cookie sheet to make a 1/2 in layer of “batter”. Place in the bottom third of the oven at 350 for about 30 minutes. Turn off the oven but leave the bread in. The bread will still be fragile for a little bit so NO TOUCHING. It’s best if it stays in the oven for about 20 minutes.

This isn’t bread. Don’t rush to the kitchen and make this expecting it to taste like the french bread you get at Jimmy John’s. It’s not. BUT it is great for those of us who are trying to steer clear of those things and still want some hot, fresh buns to sink our teeth into…

THIS IS AN EASY RECIPE THAT AVOIDS ALL THE ADDITIVES OF PRE-PAKAGED MIXES!  THANK YOU INSPECTOR GORGEOUS!

 

VEGETARIAN THANKSGIVING

 

 

VEGETARIAN THANKSGIVING

THREE SISTER’S SQUASH

The sisters in this recipe are the native American staples beans, corn and squash, which together offer a delicious main course for vegan diners.

Ingredients

  • 2 cloves garlic, minced divided
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 acorn squash
  • 1 cup red onion, diced
  • 2 serrano chiles, minced
  • 1 (15 oz)can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups corn kernels
  • 2 cups broccoli florets, diced
  • 1 ½ cups cooked wild or brown rice or quinoa(optional)
  • ½ cup fresh parsley, minced
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Preparation

  1. Put olive oil and minced garlic in a small bowl, set aside.
  2. Remove stem from squashes, and cut each in half, from top to bottom. Scoop out seeds and discard,
  3. Brush inside of each squash with the garlic oil, place flesh side up on a microwavable plate, cover with waxed paper and cook on high 7-10 minutes.
  4. While the squash is cooking, you can prepare the filling ingredients.  Heat a pan, add olive oil, and sauté onion and chile for about 2 minutes, over medium-low heat.
  5. Add garlic, black beans, corn, broccoli and rice. Cook for 3-5 minutes, keeping corn  bright yellow and broccoli  bright green. Stir in parsley, paprika, salt and pepper and continue to cook for about a minute. Adjust seasonings if needed.
  6. Scoop corn and bean mixture into center or squashes. Serve right away.

IF YOU ARE NOT A STRICT VEGAN I WOULD ADD SOME SHREDDED PEPPER JACK CHEESE OVER THE TOP!

USING QUINOA AND RINSING THE BEANS VERY WELL, MAKE THIS A GLUTEN FREE DISH AS WELL!

DELICIOUS GRILLED GARDEN PASTA

GRILLED GARDEN PASTA (1)
1 Tbsp Basil
1/2 c crumbled feta
1/4 c pine nuts
1-2 garlic cloves, minced
1 hot pepper, minced
8 oz dry spaghetti or fettuccine (I used whole wheat linguini)
1 small onion, coarsely chopped (I used a red onion for some color)
1 medium zucchini, chopped
1 orange, 1 yellow, 1 red pepper, chopped
Greek salad dressing to taste, optional (I use Kraft Greek Feta and Oregano)

In a small bowl, combine first five ingredients. Prepare pasta according to directions; drain and keep warm. Meanwhile, chop vegetables and grill on medium high heat about 20 minutes. Serve noodles with grilled vegetables and top with cheese mixture and dressing if desired.

THIS WAS SO GOOD AND EASY TO PREPARE. YOU COULD MAKE IT GLUTEN FREE BY SUBSTITUTING GLUTEN FREE NOODLES OR QUINOA! 

ALSO, CUT THE FAT BY USING A LOW FAT FETA AND A LITE DRESSING (LITE ITALIAN OR BALSAMIC WOULD WORK WELL TOO)!

LASTLY, I THOUGHT ABOUT ADDING A CAN OF BLACK BEANS FOR A TOUCH MORE PROTEIN AND FIBER…

I’M OUT OF MY GOURD

Bountiful and Delicious: Healthy Harvest Foods
Bring Color and Nutrition to the Table

When you think of autumn, you most likely envision the beautiful orange, yellow, and red hues of the season. Stroll down the produce aisle of your neighborhood grocery store and discover those same vibrant colors in the form of seasonal vegetables and fruits, such as pumpkins, squash, and apples. Best of all, these harvest foods also are packed with nutritional value. Encourage those you care for to try some new and different varieties of fall produce this year, and give them the gift of health along the way!

Winter squash and pumpkins


Winter squash and pumpkins (both members of the gourd family) come in a wide variety of colors and sizes. They are becoming increasingly popular because of their versatile use in both sweet and savory recipes, and they are good sources of complex carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals. Pumpkins are especially good sources of alpha- and beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin (an antioxidant), vitamin C, riboflavin, and iron. Cooking pumpkins (also known as sugar pumpkins or pie pumpkins) are delicious in pies, cookies, custards, and soups. Their seeds are easily toasted for a crunchy high-fiber snack.

The seeds are great when eaten by the handful or added to fruit and vegetable salads. Pumpkin and squash seeds contain:

  • Phytosterols
  • Vitamins, including:
    Folate
    Tocopherols
    Carotenoids
  • Minerals, including:
    Phosphorus
    Selenium
    Zinc

I TOAST THEM ON A COOKIE SHEET SPRAYED WITH NON-STICK COOKING SPRAY AND SPRINKLE A LITTLE SEA SALT ON TOP!

Bright orange and yellow squash
Bright orange and yellow squash contain significant amounts of carotenes, as well as some lutein and zeaxanthin (antioxidants). Butternut squash is good sliced, stewed, boiled, or baked in a pie. It is a particularly good source of calcium, magnesium, and carotenes. Spaghetti squash makes a wonderful casserole or side dish. Try it with tomato sauce in place of traditional spaghetti. Acorn and Hubbard squash are particularly good sources of potassium and fiber. Acorn squash also is high in thiamine.

Apples

APPLES
Apples come in countless varieties, each with its own color, flavor, and texture. While some types of apples such as Golden or Red Delicious are best for eating fresh and crisp, other varieties such as Crab, Bramley, and Jonathan apples are best for cooking in pies, cakes, crisps, and chutneys. Look for sauce, butter, pickle, and relish recipes that include apples. Apples are powerhouses of flavonoids, such as quercetin, as well as a great source of cholesterol-lowering phytosterols. Apples also are a good source of vitamin C, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. In addition, apples with skins are one of the best known sources of pectin—a type of soluble fiber shown to help reduce cholesterol. Try making tea by steeping oven-roasted and dried apple slices for an old-fashioned hot beverage.

RECIPE:  BUTTERNUT SQUASH WITH APPLES – VEGETARIAN AND GLUTEN FREE

Squash sections with seeds removed form small hollows that become natural containers for seasonings.

2-pound butternut squash
1/4 cup chopped hazelnuts or sliced almonds
1 Tbsp butter or margarine
1 Tbsp honey
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1 red medium unpared all-purpose apple, chopped (about 1 cup)

Wash squash and pierce with tip of a sharp knife in several places to allow steam to escape. Place squash on paper towel in microwave oven. Microwave uncovered on high 4-6 minutes until squash is hot and rind is firm but easy to cut through; cool slightly. Carefully cut into halves; remove seeds. Arrange squash halves, cut sides down, on 10-inch plate. Cover tightly and microwave on high 5-8 minutes or until squash is tender when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife. Mix remaining ingredients in small bowl. Cover tightly and microwave on high 1-2 minutes or until butter is melted and mixture is hot; stir. Cut squash halves in half. Spoon apple mixture over squash.
4 servings; 210 calories per serving.

Fruit and vegetable tips

vegetables

  • Thoroughly wash all vegetables and fruits, as you would any produce, before eating or cooking to destroy any bacteria and to remove any pesticides or herbicides from their surfaces
  • Select produce without soft spots, blemishes, or cuts
  • Eat fruits and vegetables fresh or lightly cooked to obtain the most nutrient value—avoid boiling when possible
  • Experiment with a variety of spices, herbs, and cooking methods

Fall activities


Autumn’s cool weather and beautiful foliage is a call from nature to get outside, enjoy the scenery, and get physically active. One great event for fun family fitness is visiting a pumpkin patch and picking your own pumpkins and gourds. In addition, many pumpkin patch locations feature other activities, such as corn mazes and hayrides.

Find farm locations in your area that allow visitors to pick their own fruits and vegetables by watching your local newspaper or searching the Internet for more information. TRY pickyourown.org  Whether picking apples, pears, squash, peppers, or sweet potatoes, this is great way to connect with nature, burn some calories, and come home with healthy, nutritious foods. Try canning to preserve your favorite varieties for the rest of the year, or grow your own harvest fruits and vegetables and enjoy eating them even more.

ENJOY AUTUMN!

CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE

CELEBRATED THE HALF YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF ST. PATRICK’S DAY WITH CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE IN THE CROCK POT!

IT IS SO EASY! I just throw a bag of baby carrots, 2 large potatoes cut into quarters and an onion quartered into the bottom of the crock pot.  Place a 4 pound corned beef brisket on top – fat side up.  Pour in 2 cups of chicken broth.  Cook on LOW for 8 hours or more.  In the last hour of cooking I quarter the cabbage and place it in a large pot with water to cover and a little salt and boil until tender.  Cut off the fat layer and slice the meat; return to crock pot.  Serve – lots of au jous!

I like to cook the cabbage separately but you could cut it up more and make sure there is enough broth to cover and cook it right in the crock pot.

GLUTEN FREE TOO!

Nutrition Facts

Amount Per Serving (357g)

Calories 198 Calories from Fat 90

% Daily Value *

Total Fat 10 g 15.4%

Saturated Fat 2.6 g 13%

Trans Fat

Cholesterol 27 mg 9%

Sodium 918 mg 38.3%

Total Carbohydrates 17.2 g 5.7%

Dietary Fiber 2 g8%

Sugars 10.1 g

Protein 10 g 20%

Vitamin A Vitamin C

Calcium Iron

*Based on a 2000 Calorie diet

I LOVE TO USE THE LEFT-OVERS TO MAKE THIS EASY, ARTERY-CLOGGING REUBEN NOODLE BAKE!

4.1.2

Ingredients:

  • 8 ounces uncooked medium egg noodles
  • 6 to 8 ounces thinly sliced corned beef
  • 1 can (approx. 15 ounces) sauerkraut, drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups shredded Swiss cheese
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon caraway seeds, optional
  • 1/2 cup Thousand Island dressing
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon prepared mustard
  • 2 slices dark rye or pumpernickel bread
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter

I ALSO MIX IN ANY LEFT-OVER CABBAGE, POTATO, CARROTS AND ONION (cut up)

Preparation:

Grease or spray a 13×9-inch baking dish with cooking spray.

Cook noodles in boiling salted water, following package directions. Drain and transfer to a large bowl.

Cut corned beef into small pieces; add to noodles with sauerkraut, cheese, and caraway seeds. Pour noodle mixture into the baking dish.

In another bowl, whisk together the dressing, milk, and mustard. Spoon evenly over the noodle mixture. Put torn bread into food processor and pulse to make small crumbs. Toss with the melted butter then sprinkle over the casserole. Bake in preheated 350° oven for 25 to 35 minutes.
Serves 6.

Nutritional Facts

1-1/2 cups equals 621 calories, 30 g fat (15 g saturated fat), 141 mg cholesterol, 3,130 mg sodium, 53 g carbohydrate, 7 g fiber, 35 g protein

WITH A NAME LIKE O’CONNOR, YOU NEED TO CELEBRATE ST. PATRICK’S DAY OFTEN!